Thursday, April 24, 2014

DOE and Other Federal Agencies Leading the Way with Cool Roof Technology

Posted by Webmaster on 31. August 2010 16:04

The Department of Energy (DOE) is truly leading by example. Just recently, Secretary Steven Chu announced a series of initiatives underway at DOE to more broadly implement cool roof technologies on DOE facilities and buildings across the federal government.

In a letter issued to the heads of other federal agencies, Chu and DOE are encouraging them to take similar steps at their facilities. In support, DOE has even released its Guidelines for Selecting Cool RoofsPDF, which provides technical assistance on types of roofing materials and how to select the roof that will work best on a specific facility.

So what exactly are cool roofs? Cool Roofs use lighter-colored roofing surfaces or special coatings to reflect more of the sun's heat, helping improve building efficiency by reducing cooling costs. They can also reduce the urban heat island effect and mitigate global warming. So cool roofs not only reduce energy use and offset carbon pollution, but save taxpayer dollars as well.

DOE is also expanding its research activity for cool roofs to enable technological innovation and guide policy implementation. The research effort includes developing advanced testing protocols, conducting urban heat island analyses, and undertaking studies to further quantify the direct global cooling benefits associated with cool surfaces. The Department also anticipates awarding new projects to develop higher performing, new innovative roofing materials under the Department's Small Business Innovation Research grant program.



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Comments

  • Patrick O'Leary said,

    The heat of a hot roof is energy. That energy can be harvested and put to good use.

    Essentially, AC load can be made into domestic water heat supply (harvesting the heat island). Several companies do this already. Some in an inconspicuous fashion (building integrated), with additional benefits (ie.PV).

    When will DOE recognize this advance? There are additional advances waiting in the wings.

  • Walter Zalis said,

    Good evening Mr. O'Leary -

    Have you had a chance to visit the DOE BTP Home page where more information on DOE's solar thermal activities? The site can be found at http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/index.html. For more information, please contact Bob Hassett at robert.hassett@ee.doe.gov.

  • Company secretary Housing Association said,

    A recent study by researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) found that using cool roofs and cool pavements in cities around the world can help reduce the demand for air conditioning, cool entire cities, and potentially cancel the heating effect of up to two years of worldwide carbon dioxide emissions.

  • Walter said,

    Essentially, AC load can be made into domestic water heat supply (harvesting the heat island). Several companies do this already. Some in an inconspicuous fashion (building integrated), with additional benefits (ie.PV).

  • Patrick O'Leary said,

    Walter,  Tried to view the page (it seems to have expired) and tried to ping Bob Hassett.  Neither worked.

    Still low profile buildings can harvest most of the solar loading on that big box roof with Futura's modified Sawtooth.  The un-modified version is still around and it was the best roofing technology we ever abandoned.  Now it's back and it's better than ever.