Wednesday, July 30, 2014

The Windows Volume Purchase Program Makes Follow-up Announcement

Posted by Webmaster on 29. March 2012 15:07

This blog post may contain broken links or information that is no longer accessible.

Two days after announcing big changes to the High Performance Windows Volume Purchase Program (WVP), the WVP team has one more new and very important program update to share:

Prices for windows on www.WindowsVolumePurchase.org will be no longer be listed on the site.

An updated announcement from Tuesday can be found below with this information.

_______________________________________________________

The High Performance Windows Volume Purchase (WVP) Program Team is announcing big changes to the market transformation effort, following a two hour stakeholder strategy session on February 2nd, 2012. The strategy session, held via webinar and hosted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), welcomed nearly 50 participants from window manufacturers, non-profit organizations, Federal agencies and members of the WVP team itself. The strategy session focused on four WVP issues:

  •  Current WVP Program Design
  • Suggestions for improving the WVP
  • Other mechanisms to advance sales of R-5 windows
  • Path forward for WVP

Taking strategy session feedback into consideration, the WVP team has released a program update on how the WVP will be modified for the rest of 2012. These changes include:

  1. Phase II of the program (scheduled to run from May 2011-April 2012) will be extended until the end of the year (December 31, 2012).
  2. The WVP team will now require participating vendors to report TOTAL R5 sales from all sources (vendors previously could opt to report only sales from the program website).
  3. WVP vendor participants must report more than zero sales of R5 windows in order to remain in the program.
  4. The 20-window minimum purchase requirement has been eliminated. There is no longer a purchase minimum amount.
  5. Pricing will no longer be included on http://www.windowsvolumepurchase.org/.
  6. New vendors that meet WVP specifications will be allowed to join the program (this includes vendors that only participated in phase I of the program).

In April, PNNL will send out a new Agreement Letter to participating window vendors with the above program changes noted. These agreements must be signed by May 1, 2012. It is important to mention that the program is still under review and further changes may be forthcoming as longer term strategies are discussed. The WVP team will be releasing more information concerning their plans for 2012 in April as well, including a list of future trade shows and workshops.



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Comments

  • Randy Steer said,

    It's been over a month since this posting announced the end of the 20-window minimum purchase, but the 3rd paragraph on the program's home page still begins by citing the limit.

    If the elimination of the limit was intended to make the program appeal to individual homeowners, I have a couple of additional observations:

    1.  There should be some "mouseover" (pop-up) help on the more technical search factors in the left sidebar.  For instance, most homeowners can figure out that their construction-type is "residential", but I don't know -- and I bet other homeowners don't -- what "United Inches" means, or what a Performance Grade of 25 to 100 means.

    2.  With prices no longer being shown, the website is of limited value to consumers:  

       2a:  There's no way of knowing if a vendor is actually offering them the "volume purchase" price.  (There's also no real way for the government to know if the volume-purchase prices vendors are offering is actually a real discount over current market prices.  I.e. no way to judge the actual effectiveness of the program.)

       2b:  If the prices are in fact lower than what buyers might expect, not showing them loses the opportunity to give the shopper a pleasant surprise, like "Wow, that's more affordable than I thought!  I should do that."  (I think most people -- including me -- assume that replacing all the windows in a house is a very expensive proposition, and probably won't get serious about it until shown that it's affordable.)

       2c:  I ran a typical search and got a list of 30 products and vendors.  Without some price cues, where would I even begin looking?